NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover is seen at the site from which it reached down to drill into a rock target called ‘Buckskin’ on lower Mount Sharp in this low-angle self-portrait taken August 5, 2015 and released August 19, 2015. The selfie combines several component images taken by Curiosity’s Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) during the 1,065th Martian day, or sol, of the rover’s work on Mars, according to a NASA news release. REUTERS/NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS/Handout

This is a NASA seminar celebrating the fact that Curiosity has been roaming the red planet for five years. With speakers James K. Erickson and Ashwin R. Vasavada, both from Mars Science Laboratory Project Scientist, at JPL.

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Nearly five years after its celebrated arrival at Mars, the Curiosity rover continues to reveal Mars as a once-habitable planet. Early in the planet’s history, generations of streams and lakes created the landforms that Curiosity explores today.

The rover currently is climbing through the foothills of Mount Sharp, a 3-mile-high mountain formed from sediment brought in by water and wind. This talk will cover the latest findings from the mission, the challenges of exploration with an aging robot, and what lies ahead.